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Tag: hawaiiwildfires23
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  • April

    USACE marks 100 days of debris removal in Lahaina

    April 25 marked the 100th day of Lahaina debris removal for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the wake of the August 2023 wildfires that claimed more than 100 lives, displaced more than 6,000 families and caused around $5.5 billion in property damage on the Hawaiian Island of Maui.
  • USACE reaches milestone in Hawai‘i wildfire debris removal mission

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers cleared debris from the 500th residential property within Lahaina, Hawai’i, April 2.
  • April 1st a day for Lahaina’s young scholars to remember

    April 1, 2024 marks the first day that King Kamehameha III Elementary School students attend classes at the temporary replacement campus. The Lahaina school, damaged beyond repair in the Aug. 8, 2023, wildfires, became an important project for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After receiving a critical public facilities mission assignment from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, USACE handled the $78 million elementary school installation, subcontracting Pono Aina Management, a Native Hawaiian organization.
  • March

    USACE begins Phase 2 commercial debris removal operations in Lahaina

    A U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contractor began hauling debris from commercial properties impacted by the Aug. 8, 2023, wildfires in the town of Lahaina, Hawai’i, March 22. This begins Phase 2 of the debris removal process that includes removal of remaining structural ash and debris, as well as soil testing.
  • Temporary King Kamehameha III Elementary School Campus Dedicated March 25

    A blessing and dedication ceremony was hosted March 25, by the Hawaii Department of Education with federal, state and local partners coming together to celebrate the opening of a temporary replacement campus for the King Kamehameha III Elementary School, which was damaged beyond repair in the Aug. 8, 2024, Lahaina wildfires.
  • USACE completes vessel debris removal operations, reaches major milestone

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers debris removal mission on Maui reached an important milestone on March 15. Under the management and supervision of USACE, contractors completed the removal of vessel debris from 80 fire-damaged vessels received from the U.S. Coast Guard.
  • February

    USACE Transfers Lahaina Temporary Elementary School to Hawaii State Department of Education

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is pleased to announce the successful installation and turnover of the temporary King Kamehameha III Elementary School in Lahaina to the Hawai‘i State Department of Education Feb. 27. In collaboration with FEMA and the State of Hawai‘i, USACE embarked on a mission to design and oversee the installation of this critical educational facility following the devastating wildfires of Aug. 8, 2023, which displaced approximately 600 elementary school students from their original Lahaina school.
  • January

    Historic building specialists visit Lahaina National Historic Landmark District, survey structures impacted by Hawaiʻi Wildfires

    A specialized team consisting of a structural engineer, historical architect and historian assisted the Hawaiʻi Wildfires Mission by assessing structures in or adjacent to the Lahaina National Historic Landmark District on Maui, Jan. 17-21.
  • USACE continues the Hawaii Wildfires Recovery Mission

    More than five months after the August 8 wildfires in Hawaii ravaged large portions of Maui including Lahaina, the former capital of the Hawaiian Empire, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continues working on a Federal Emergency Management Agency mission to remove debris from affected areas.
  • December

    JFO, RFO, EFO one mission; one Ohana – USACE employees deploy to assist Maui recovery from the wildfires

    When fire ravished the historic towns of Lahaina and Kula, Hawai’i, on the island of Maui in August 2023, the Federal Emergency Management Agency was one of the first agencies on the site to assist the people in recovering from the devasting effects of the deadliest United States wildfire in more than 100 years.